Do Good

It’s almost TIME!

ELEVEN days until I leave the lovely mountain town of Bozeman and move to DEEEEEEENVER, Colorado!

it's a colorful state, weee!

Very exciting.

The only part is, I am leaving a life behind. I’m sure there are only good things ahead of me, but goodbyes are hard.  Like I’ve heard many say, a goodbye is a very poorly named ritual…is there really anything good about it? Except the excitement of a new open door?

One good thing, besides all of the wonderful well wishes, is the advice I’ve been getting. Some of it isn’t so good, some of it is weird (although “always floss” is probably something I really should listen to) and one particular piece has really stuck with me, from a most unlikely source.

One of the cooks I work with a lot at the nursing home is in her mid-thirties, with several kids and several divorces under her belt. She’s smart and capable, but as she’s from rural West Virginia, she isn’t very educated. Yet, out of nowhere, she’s quite educated on life: the only thing she said to me by way of goodbye was “Do good in Colorado.”

“Do. Good.”

So simple, and for some reason it really just stuck with me. It’s all I’ve been thinking about.

I guess that, when it comes down to it, that’s what I want to do with my life. Sure, I want to be happy, and see the world, find a career (or careers) that I adore, make a home on the coast, surround myself with those who love and respect me.

But under it all? I want to do good.

I may be stressed about the move (i.e. stressed about the sheer amount of packing I still need to do) and nervous about my job and slightly freaked out by moving in with a boy. I’ve been worried about what I am getting out of my life, what I want out of it, what’s going to happen when I’m older, how short and unpredictable life is.

Among all these worries, I forgot that the root of the human experience is tied to our interactions with humans, all lifeforms, and as a result, it is tied to our relationship with the planet and the entire universe, and our treatment of all of this.

So thanks, Cook A, for reminding me that life really doesn’t have to be as complicated as I make it.

And that if you let yourself listen to the people around you, sometimes the most random sources can make it all startlingly clear.

Your Career Assessment Said What?

Yesterday, in a fit of desperation (so many choices) I decided to hit up the internet in search of a career assessment or two.

I found a plethora of sites promising to point one in the right direction of SUCCESS!, but unfortunately, several of them refused to give the results of the 100-question test without a credit card number (not that they would find anything on mine, nonetheless) but a few did give me a solid response. I have no idea how scientific these were, but while my favorite results included “singer, dancer, artist, journalist, writer” I had two different careers that were highlighted in all four of the sites I visited.

Because I bet you can never guess, here they are:

A clergy member.

AAAAAND…

A genetic counselor. (I had to look that one up).

Sadly, neither of these careers are anything I had ever imagined doing. Um, a member of the clergy? Although I’m sure this encompasses much more, the only image I’m getting is me, fully enrobed, hanging out in the confessional listening to my flock.

Upon reflection, I am often entreated for advice from many of my friends, but this generally does not include asking for forgiveness from He (nor is it about dealing with any genetic diseases they might be carrying, which is primarily what a genetic counselor does, fyi) but more along the lines of  “oh-my-God-what-did-I-do-what-now?”

As mentioned, the scientificity of said assessments is questionable. But just in case, I’m going to go read the Bible and research genetic diseases.

Hey, you never know.